Show at UNESCO's Paris HQ sheds light on Korea's mother-of-pearl lacquerware

Image for Show at UNESCO's Paris HQ sheds light on Korea's mother-of-pearl lacquerware

Lacquer trees have grown and been cultivated in Asian countries for centuries. Its sticky sap, or “ot” in Korean, has served as one of the oldest natural paints used to create a glossy finishing layer on furniture and crafts ― through what is called the “otchil” technique. While Korea, China and Japan shared a similar culture surrounding lacquerware until the 668-935 Unified Silla era on the Korean Peninsula, the three came to develop their own aesthetics afterward. During the 918-1392 Goryeo Kingdom, Korea began inlaying mother-of-pearl, a shimmering material found in seashells, on lacquered objects.


Download the app to read the full story



Find your stan

Below all are groups mentioned in this article